CARING FOR HYDRANGEAS

blue hydrangeas, eucalyptus, flowers, table, blooms2
We seem to have developed a mild obsession with Hydrangeas recently…not only for its enormous, striking blooms when they’re in flower but also how they can be beautifully transformed into a permanent interior decoration when dried out. We thought this obsession warranted a little more knowledge, so we asked our friends at the Norfolk Olive Tree Company to give us some tips on caring for Hydrangeas, and this is what we learned…
hydrangers, Flowers, styling, painted wall
First discovered in Japan, the name Hydrangea comes from the Greek “hydor” meaning water, and “angos”meaning jar or vessel. Roughly translated it means “water barrel” referring to the species need for plenty of water! The Hydrangea is a beautiful flowering Shrub and will flower from mid to late summer on the previous year’s growth. Mophead and lace cap hydrangeas will bloom with little attention, but regular pruning encourages vigorous growth that will produce a better display. The climbing hydrangea also enjoys an annual prune.
 Blooming hydrangeas, pink hydrangeas
Where shall I plant my Hydrangea?
Hydrangeas do well in moist well-drained soil, in a cooler semi-shady part of the garden. They do not respond well to harsh east-facing sites where cold winds can damage spring growth, best also to avoid drier sunny spots.
Hydrangeas in a basket, roses, country kitchen, stone floor
When do I prune my Hydrangea?
Most pruning is carried out in late winter or early spring. However, the climbing hydrangea is pruned after flowering in summer.
Dead blooms on mophead hydrangeas can, in mild areas, be removed just after flowering, but it is best to leave them on the plant over winter to provide frost protection for the tender growth buds below. Remove the dead flower heads in early spring, cutting back the stem to the first strong, healthy pair of buds down from the faded bloom.
hydrangers, Flowers, styling, painted wall, oak bookcase, oak furniture
Established plants will tolerate hard pruning in spring, but reducing heavily in one session is likely to hamper flowering for the next couple of summers. To avoid this, reduce the size of the plant gradually over a number of years.
Pink Hydrangeas in bloom, growing hydrangeas
What shall I feed my hydrangea?
Use a slow release fertiliser in early spring with a high PH.
Do not over fertilise your hydrangeas as this will cause big green leaves to grow and stunt bloom production.
blue hydrangeas, flowers, blue petals
Watering my hydrangea.
Hydrangeas are slightly fussy about water. Try not to let them dry out.
During droughts or long periods between rainfall, give the roots a good soak with the hose.
Dried flowers, dried hydrangeas, vintage bedroom
Drying Hydrangeas
You can enjoy the beautiful shape of hydrangeas all year round if you dry them out. They turn a stunning autumnal shade of golden brown or shades of vintage blue and pink if you catch them at the right time. They look beautiful bunched together in a vase and can create a more permanent focal point in the bedroom, which is ideal if you want the look of flowers but you don’t want any overpowering floral fragrances.
Here are just a few tips if you want to do this at home….
Dried Hydrangeas, dried flowers, vintage bedroom, bed, mustart throw
Leave the hydrangea flower until the blooming season is over (around end July beginning of August) around this time they’ll take on a kind of aged, vintage appearance.
 –
Cut the stems around 30-40cm from the bloom and place in a vase with some fresh water.
 –
Place in a cool dark place and let the water naturally evaporate.
When the water is gone, your flower should be dry and ready to display!
 Dried flowers, succulents, feathers, plants, cactus,
 Keep us posted on how you get on!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s